Helping you choose the right area to live

Lang Town and Country information on areas of Plymouth and surrounding locations

This area is centered around Saltash, The Gateway to Cornwall, and is easily accessed from Plymouth by the Tamar Bridge.

This area is situated on the east bank of the River Plym and includes Plymstock, Mountbatten, Oreston, Hooe and Turnchapel.

For those looking to buy or rent property in the central suburbs of Plymouth, this is a mainly affluent part of the city that includes many sought-after areas.

Steeped in British maritime history, Plymouth is one of the country’s forgotten corners, located on the Tamar Estuary on the borders of Devon & Cornwall.

Downderry is a coastal village in South East Cornwall and is situated 18 miles west of Plymouth and one mile east of Seaton. Downderry has a long beach of light shingle.

This beautiful area of the Westcountry is renowned for its stunning views and rolling countryside, and includes Rame, Torpoint & Mount Edgcumbe.

Ocean City

Below is an extract from Coast Magazine and a video by Visit Plymouth, highlighting various history and information on what the city has to offer.

This is Devon’s ‘Ocean City’ and it’s a worthy title. From the Pilgrim Fathers’ Mayflower to the Royal Navy’s HMS Albion, Plymouth has sea-faring in its DNA. With nearly ten miles of urban waterfront – a line of marinas, docklands and seaside promenades, stretching from the mouth of the River Plym to the Tamar Estuary – it’s a haven for all things ship-shaped, from yachts and fishing boats to frigates and cross-channel ferries. Plymouth Sound is one of the world’s finest natural harbours.

Life in this city-on-sea hasn’t all been plain sailing. Since the War, which wiped out much of its original centre, it has struggled with

confidence, identity and, in some areas, poverty. But now this historic English port is beginning to find its feet.

Gearing up for the Mayflower 400 celebrations in 2020, the city is spending millions on improving the waterfront. Already, its Royal William Yard, a vast 19th-century Naval victualling yard, has been transformed into a maritime, live-work destination. Run-down parts of Devonport are getting a facelift. ‘There is an energy and positivity in the city that wasn’t there before,’ says newcomer Leigh Mason, who noticed ‘a massive sea change in the way Plymouth delivers culture’.

This is Devon’s ‘Ocean City’ and it’s a worthy title. From the Pilgrim Fathers’ Mayflower to the Royal Navy’s HMS Albion, Plymouth has sea-faring in its DNA. With nearly ten miles of urban waterfront – a line of marinas, docklands and seaside promenades, stretching from the mouth of the River Plym to the Tamar Estuary – it’s a haven for all things ship-shaped, from yachts and fishing boats to frigates and cross-channel ferries. Plymouth Sound is one of the world’s finest natural harbours.

Life in this city-on-sea hasn’t all been plain sailing. Since the War, which wiped out much of its original centre, it has struggled with confidence, identity and, in some areas, poverty. But now this historic English port is beginning to find its feet.

Gearing up for the Mayflower 400 celebrations in 2020, the city is spending millions on improving the waterfront. Already, its Royal William Yard, a vast 19th-century Naval victualling yard, has been transformed into a maritime, live-work destination. Run-down parts of Devonport are getting a facelift. ‘There is an energy and positivity in the city that wasn’t there before,’ says newcomer Leigh Mason, who noticed ‘a massive sea change in the way Plymouth delivers culture’.